Five Years Later

Monday, the 19th, will be the five-year anniversary of my brain surgery.

That means it was just a little less than five years ago that I met a man–a friend of a friend–who quietly listened to my husband and I explain my surgery and then shocked us by sharing that he, too, had once been severely affected by a brain injury. In his case, it was a stroke.

It was shocking to me–just two months since my surgery, sitting in a wheelchair, easily fatigued, and struggling even to talk–because this man seemed completely normal. There was nothing about him that hinted at his past physical struggles or any present limitations. “That’s because it happened fifteen years ago; so don’t worry, fifteen years from now no one will ever guess what you’ve been through. I promise.” he told me.

Do you think I believed him? Of course not. I decided that his remarkable recovery was a special case, a miracle, and that I shouldn’t expect the same. I was also filled with skepticism and I wondered how he could so confidently make such a promise. Who did he think he was, anyway? (And then I immediately felt guilty for thinking that, since he was only trying to be nice and offer encouragement.)

I never had a chance to talk to him again, but I’ve often thought of him. Here I am, just five years later, and if I ever divulge my past surgery to an acquaintance, I am met with the same skepticism and disbelief. “I would have never guessed,” people say or, “But there doesn’t seem to be anything wrong with you.” Of course I still have my limitations–I can never forget or escape them!–but they aren’t so obvious any more.

So, Mr. Terry, let me say that I was wrong to doubt you. You were right; and I hope that, in another ten years, you are even more so.

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